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Industry Insight Tips & Advice Ultimate Guide

The Ultimate Guide to Customer Support: How Support Impacts the Health of Construction Operations

So, your company is thinking of upgrading to a new, streamlined construction software program and ditching that old, generic software. But, one of your biggest qualms is that the new software may be hard to use, or confusing, or maybe integrating into your day-to-day business activities will be impossible. Maybe you’re worried about something going wrong with the software down the road.

What would you do then?

You’re right for taking this transition seriously, as it’s a big change for your company. However, with the right customer support, you won’t have to face these challenges alone. Customer support and account management in construction software are one of the most important features to look for before choosing a product. This guide will explain why.

The Importance of Customer Support in Construction Software

The construction industry thrives on building structures and renovating spaces. Time spent ironing out the wrinkles in a software program or transitioning to new technology can slow that down. For those reasons and more, construction software support is incredibly important. 

1. It Helps During the Launch Phase

Transitioning from simple, stand-alone, and feature-limited software to a fully-functional software program may seem overwhelming for your construction company. Teaching employees that are used to old-school spreadsheets and programs designed over 40 years ago won’t be easy to do on your own, despite knowing the value it will bring in the end.

Customer support is at its most important during this stage of the game. The best construction software companies will offer one-on-one and group training to prepare key employees for the role, allowing them to lead the way for other employees. This training can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the company.

For example, Premier Construction Software’s initial training program lasts six weeks. During that time, employees learn how to run a fictional business using the software program. By the end of the six-week period, the business goes live and is fully functional with trained employees who know how the software works. Whichever construction software you choose should come with a similar level of start-up support.

2. Issues Happen Along the Way

Even the most well-oiled software might experience a snag every now and then. Most often, it’s a user error and the user doesn’t even realize it. Sometimes, there’s a hardware issue that needs to be identified. It’s rarely an issue with the software or an update, but it can be a possibility.

The problem is your company can’t come to a screeching halt because the software decided to take a nap. Your team needs that software back up and running as soon as possible in order to focus their efforts on other important functions. 

For those situations, there is no replacement for expert customer support teams. These professionals should have the knowledge and ability to get your company’s data entry, drawing organization, storage, and accounts payable or receivable back up and running.

But what does solving this business emergency look like? Will your representative have to spend hours on hold, or wait for a response to an email? That’s the case in some situations. Other construction software programs assign an Account Manager to each client, giving them a point of contact to reach out to in any situation. They’ll get the ball rolling and ensure that the customer is receiving the attention they require.

3. It Avoids Growing Pains

Like most companies, the goal is most likely to grow and take on more, bigger, or more valuable projects. But, with that expansion comes growing pains (especially with some software companies). Creating new users, tracking changes, and ensuring everyone see the documents and data they need can be a challenge during this phase of growth.

Streamlined and automated construction software equipped with top-of-the-line customer support can minimize the impact of these growing pains. Customer support can help with managing new and old user accounts in and out of your organization, integrating expansions or updates, and tracking changes or adjusting workflows to ensure everyone is accountable and involved.

It can’t be overstated how important an expert customer support service team is to a construction company at this phase. Rather than users chasing their tails and making more work for themselves, a customer support representative can help the user identify the correct feature to use, how to track an error, or which update they need. The user can then learn how to avoid this mistake in the future, making the time spent working with the support professional well worth it.

Make Sure Your Construction Software Includes Customer Support

If you’re shopping for new construction management software, don’t overlook customer support. This is one of the most critical aspects of ensuring a construction software program integrates with your business and helps take it to new heights. 

The success of a construction business is a reflection of the choices of employees, customers, stakeholders, and their organizations. These decisions can play a critical role in determining the success of your organization.

Not to worry, Premier has your back. From the very beginning, we will ensure you feel fully supported and are successful. End the wait today and get your business back to financial control.

Schedule a demo today

Author Biography:

Tom Scalisi has over 15 years of experience working in the trades. Since moving to full-time freelance writing, he has developed a passion for helping construction companies grow. He enjoys teaching contractors how technology can streamline their businesses and educating them about their rights during payment disputes. 

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Industry Insight Resources Tips & Advice Ultimate Guide

How Severe is the Construction Industry’s Labor Shortage?

A lack of skilled workers is nothing new to the construction industry. Trade organizations, hiring managers, and small businesses have been complaining that the trades just aren’t attracting young adults anymore, and the current workforce is aging out.

But that labor shortage became even more apparent during the pandemic. With fewer people willing to risk going to work combined with a boom in residential construction, the labor shortage continued to grow. How severe is the issue, and how can it get better? These are the questions the industry should be asking.

How Severe is the Construction Industry’s Labor Shortage?

While the construction industry faced labor shortages in the past (think back to the housing boom of the 2000s), the one it’s facing now is a serious challenge. Estimates show that to keep up with current demand, the US construction industry would have to add 650,000 skilled workers to its ranks. If projections are correct, the current trajectory will require 2.2 million new workers within the next three years just to meet current housing needs.

The Canadian outlook is actually worse. Numbers in Canada require hiring an additional 80,000 workers. Considering population numbers, this is a higher percentage than the issue seen in the US.

What’s causing it?

Retirements

Plain and simple: folks are retiring. The average age of retirement for construction workers in the US is 61 years old. In Canada, the age of retirement across all industries is slightly higher at 64 years old. With over 20 percent of the industry’s workforce being over 55, they’re leaving in droves. 

The pandemic didn’t help. The Great Recession helped many employees find the door, spurring moves to other industries as well as trips to social security offices around the country. 

Lack of Young People

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the interest of young people in entering the construction trade is far too low. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 20 to 24-year-old segment made up just 7 percent of the survey respondents working in the construction industry. 

The root cause of this issue is the younger generation’s upbringing that focuses on college and degrees rather than skills or licenses. Instead of construction, this age group is seeking employment in the medical, business/management, and tech or IT fields. 

Market Competition

Even if there wasn’t a housing boom at hand, the industry would be in trouble. Unemployment rates are low, while vacant job numbers are very high, indicating that every industry is facing the same shortage. In this environment, job seekers have options.

Construction employees are leaving job sites for better working conditions in the service or warehouse industries. Those that are staying in construction, they’re able to bounce from employer to employer in search of better pay and better healthcare.

Increased Demand

The pandemic might’ve shut some individual job sites down, but it didn’t slow the construction industry much. Project volumes ballooned with a shift from typical commercial construction to a focus on residential home building. Folks were leaving cities in droves, building new houses, or renovating older ones in the country in order to escape the monotony of struggling cities.

Commercial construction’s direction changed as well. With so many folks staying home and ordering their goods online, fulfillment centers became a precious commodity. Warehouse construction is experiencing a boom in volume without a boom in skilled labor.

What Does This Mean for the Industry?

Ultimately, the labor shortage will have a profound effect on the construction industry. Business owners will need to offset increased costs, and keeping projects on track will seem an impossible task. 

Increased Prices

Construction companies big and small have had to increase the amount they pay their employees over the course of the pandemic. They’ve also had to improve employee benefits to sweeten the deal. The issue is that with already slim profit margins, these companies have had to offload these increased costs of doing business onto customers and project owners.

More Delays

One of the issues of hiring during a labor shortage is that it’s not always possible to find quality employees or vet their experience before hiring. Many projects have gone off the rails in recent history due to poor quality and low productivity. Couple those issues with up to 25 percent of project owners reporting delayed or incomplete deliveries, and delays abound.

Lack of Experienced Leadership

With so much of the experienced workforce hanging up their hardhats, there’s going to be a marked reduction in seasoned leadership. Employers will be forced to promote less experienced employees to foreman or project management positions than they had in the past. While there’s always a learning curve, this lack of experience may cause a ripple effect through the workforce, possibly causing lower productivity, more waste, and more inefficiencies until this group of managers matures.

What Can the Construction Industry Do About the Shortage?

Construction as a whole has been trying to solve the labor shortage issue for a very long time. However, there are a few moves that companies can make to lessen the impact a labor shortage has on the company’s growth.

Consider Improving Wages and Benefits

The modern job seeker has options, and it’s important that companies make their outfit the most attractive. Higher pay than the competition is certainly helpful, but so are better healthcare programs, fringe benefits like childcare reimbursement, tuition assistance, or more days off for time with family. 

These changes may increase younger job seekers’ attention, giving the construction industry a leg up on manufacturing or e-commerce. They can also help one company stand out against the rest. While this will ultimately cost the company more money, it may be one of the only ways to keep a staff full during a continental labor shortage.

Focus on Training

Rather than finding new skilled labor, construction companies can attempt to mold current employees into skilled ones. Investing in tuition or training programs will help employees learn the types of skills that a company can build on. Sending them to specialized schools or setting up programs where senior staff mentors them on their way towards licensure may also be options.

While there is always a risk in training someone only to lose them to another company, consider that it’s possible to invest in a person’s future and create a loyal employee. It also gives employees the feeling that the employer cares—something today’s generation of job seekers is looking for. This can help retain staff rather than let them slip away to competitors offering slightly more money.

Reduce Inefficiencies

Getting more boots on the ground is a challenge that will take long-term planning, so the construction industry needs to focus on finding solutions in the interim. One move that most construction companies could benefit from is reducing inefficiencies through technology.

For example, companies that switch from basic accounting software to construction-specific management software can lower some of their dependence on specific manpower. These software programs are customizable, allowing users to tailor workflows, create custom forms, provide wireless access to current drawings, and track progress through accurate, up-to-date job costing reports.

While technology might not replace skilled labor, it can help make management personnel more efficient. With access to cloud-based drawing storage, site leadership can ensure the crews are working from the most current drawings to prevent mistakes. These folks will also be able to send and receive RFIs and change orders and their approvals from the site, potentially reducing the need to leave for administrative tasks.

Promote Awareness

The construction industry still has a stigma, and it’s preventing younger job seekers from considering it as a potential career path. The idea of it being a low-paying, gruff boys’ club is keeping folks with degrees from joining the ranks of new electricians, carpenters, plumbers, and other trades.

The industry must consider promoting awareness that a career in construction can be a fulfilling and inclusive one. With the potential for promotions, a great living, and competitive benefits, getting the word out that construction could be a viable option for young folks shouldn’t be hard.

Part of promoting awareness may mean shifting the focus from marketing the business to marketing the careers. Senior management may need to partner with local youth organizations and social groups to encourage open dialogue about the industry. Adopting modern media streams like social media, YouTube, and podcasts can help reach younger audiences as well.

None of these tactics will have an immediate impact on the labor shortage, but they can help change the stigma that construction is a dead-end career choice. Young folks who are on the fence about what to do after high school or college may not be considering the industry, and some pointed effort can help. 

The Labor Shortage Isn’t Going Away—Companies Have to Act Now

Ultimately, every industry is feeling the pain of the labor shortage. Construction, however, is particularly affected since it needs skilled workers. It’s important that the industry—and the companies that comprise it—make the moves necessary to attract new employees, retain current ones, and make sure they’re operating as efficiently as possible over the next decade.

Get your business back in financial control amidst the labor shortages. Find out how Premier can empower your business for success.

Schedule a demo today.

Author Biography:

Tom Scalisi has over 15 years of experience working in the trades. Since moving to full-time freelance writing, he has developed a passion for helping construction companies grow. He enjoys teaching contractors how technology can streamline their businesses and educating them about their rights during payment disputes. 

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Industry Insight Tips & Advice Trends & Technology Ultimate Guide

Why is Software Support Critical to the Success of Your Business?

We know that changing financial and project management software can be stressful. The transition is often bumpy and can take several weeks or months to implement. With Premier Software you get the help and support you need throughout the software implementation and use process.

We help ensure that you are getting the most out of your investment and that your team is working at its peak efficiency. Here’s how Premier Construction Software provides you with the support you need to improve your business success.

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Features Industry Insight Tips & Advice Ultimate Guide

Are Project Management Solutions Really the Solution?

When shopping for construction project management software, it can be difficult to determine if it’s best to go with a standalone service or an all-in-one that includes accounting. Both have their pluses and minuses, and a lot depends on how you run your business and the size of your staff.  

Premier Construction Software provides an all-in-one solution for your project management, accounting, and financial data needs. And while standalone PM solutions may look attractive, they really create more work than they save. Here are some of the features that Premier provides that standalone products don’t. 

Real-time cost data 

Some standalone project management solutions sync data with the accounting software at the end of the day or when told to manually. So, the data that is represented in the PM solution can be hours or days old. Project managers can’t be sure that they are looking at the latest and greatest information unless they sync the data themselves. 

With Premier, project managers have instant access to all cost and budget data and details as soon as it’s entered. This includes updates to project estimates when budget change orders are approved. The software automatically updates the budget and creates progress billing lines. Project managers can be confident that the information they have, even when accessed on a mobile device in the field, is accurate and up to date. This helps them make better decisions about the project to keep it on schedule and on budget. 

 

Access to all financial data 

Some standalone solutions provide only general information about costs, such as subtotals by cost type or grand totals. Managers can’t drill down into the data specifics because not all the data is shared with the PM solution. 

Premier’s financial data isn’t based on what one program does and doesn’t share with another. All of its information comes directly from the source, allowing project managers to get the information they need, including details and documents. They can look at all costs for a cost code and type and determine if a transaction has been coded correctly, ensuring that costs are properly allocated. Using the forecasting module, PMs can account for unanticipated costs and request internal budget transfers to keep the project on track. 

 

Custom billing forms 

Some solutions provide standard billing forms (like the AIA G702 and 703), but there isn’t much flexibility. Or they only provide templates for generalized invoices. Companies have to create their own invoice templates outside the system to meet their client’s needs. Then that information has to be entered into the accounting software, creating two sources for original data. This double-entry can lead to costly errors. 

Premier’s customized billing forms allow you to design just the form you need to match your client’s requirements. This flexibility allows you to present your billing the way your client wants to see it without adopting a workaround. You only have to enter the data once and have access to all the documents and reports you need to support the billing. Need to make a correction? Instead of a lengthy voiding process, our software allows you to quickly make one-click edits and simple invoice reversals. 

 

Detailed reporting 

Some standalone solutions only receive summary cost data from the accounting system. The export of data doesn’t include detailed information or images of documents to help users research issues. If a problem or question comes up, workers must look at multiple sources to find the information they need. 

Premier offers the ability to drill down to specific transactions and get all the information you need to solve a problem or answer a question in just one platform. Reports can be customized to provide as much, or as little data as is necessary. From generalized summary reports to detailed transaction reports, PMs can get the level of information they need to keep their projects on budget. This allows project managers to quickly get the accurate information they need to manage the project and make key decisions. 

 

Equipment and inventory cost integrations 

Some standalone PM solutions don’t support inventory or equipment cost and revenue tracking. Most companies choose to track these separately in a spreadsheet or by hand as a workaround. This can lead to potential mistakes and inaccurate cost and revenue data. 

Premier’s integrated equipment and inventory modules provide tracking, costing, and purchasing tasks that help ensure the accuracy of billing and cost data. You can track equipment-related expenses and assign mark-ups by the hour, day, week, or month. It also enables you to track historical supplier pricing and assign custom billing prices with custom mark-up codes. This ensures your company gets the revenue it deserves when using its own inventory and equipment and lets you know when it’s time to invest in new equipment or purchase more inventory. 

Automation 

Some PM solutions offer little or no automation of tasks. In addition, because data must be entered into the accounting system and the PM system, they require double the amount of work to keep data accurate in both systems.

Premier allows automation of routine and repetitive tasks, like repetitive invoice entry and automatic pay when paid payments. In addition, when an approved change order is received, the software auto-generates progress billing lines and creates and emails subcontract and purchase order change orders to subcontractors and suppliers. This saves workers time and creates workflow efficiency. 

And now for our verdict…

Premier allows contractors and subcontractors to get the real-time data they need to the level of detail they require, provide custom billing forms, track equipment, and inventory expenses and revenues, and take advantage of automation to increase productivity and efficiency. For more information or a free demo, invest in your business and contact Premier today.

Author Biography:

Dawn Killough is a construction writer with over 20 years of experience with construction payments, from the perspectives of subcontractors and general contractors. Dawn has held roles such as a staff accountant, green building advisor, project assistant, and contract administrator.  Her work for general contractors, design firms, and subcontractors has even led to the publication of blogs on several construction tech websites and her book, Green Building Design 101.

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Tips & Advice

Is Manual Data Entry Costing Your Business? Why Automation is the Solution

If you think that investing in software to automate your systems will cost you more money than doing everything manually, you’re not alone. Many businesses operate under the assumption that paying for automation is more expensive than paying people to do things. The truth is there are hidden costs to doing things by hand, and those costs can significantly affect your bottom line.

We’re going to look at the hidden costs you may not realize you’re incurring by doing your data entry manually. The magnitude of some may surprise you.

1. Increased error rate

Workers entering data manually, without verification, can have an error rate as high as 4%. That means for every 50 entries, two are wrong. In an experiment in 2009, it was shown that data entry workers made up to 10.23 errors when entering data from thirty spreadsheets. This is the nature of human data entry.

When errors involve money, the stakes are high. These errors could lead to over-and underpayments, over-and undercharging customers, disruptions to the accounting and auditing processes, and may lead to financial trouble. Data entry errors have cost companies millions of dollars.

2. It takes time

Manual data entry takes time. The average typist can perform 10,000 to 15,000 keystrokes per hour. Depending on the amount of data and its form, it can take even the fastest typist hours to perform data entry. If the data requires comprehension or analysis before entry, this slows down the process even more.

It could take a competent operator between 8 and 10 minutes to enter 400 units of data. This may not seem like much, but if the volume of data is high, it can cost your company valuable time that could be spent on other workflows, like analyzing the data.

3. Can’t focus on important business tasks

With so much time spent ensuring that the data entered is correct and finding and fixing errors, there is no time left to work on the business. Managers spend their time ensuring that the data they’re reporting is accurate and less time actually analyzing that data. A survey found that 37% of manufacturing professionals don’t trust the reliability of manually entered data when making strategic decisions. If you can’t trust the data you’re getting from your team, how can you grow your business or take on additional work?

4. Inhibits business growth

When management receives data, it often makes decisions based on that information, whether it’s correct or not. These decisions may inhibit the growth of the business. For example, a costly mistake can lead managers to believe a project is over budget when it’s not. They then make moves to cut company spending to protect the company, when instead, they should be investing in future growth.

5. Hidden costs

Most companies think automation costs more than entering data by hand. The truth is there are hidden costs to entering data manually. There’s the obvious labor to enter the data, then more labor to check for mistakes, and more labor to fix the mistakes. At each level, it becomes more expensive and time-consuming to detect and correct mistakes.

It has been shown that incorrect data can cost companies up to 30% or more of their revenue. In particular, a 2018 Goldman Sachs report stated that the direct and indirect costs of manual paper invoice processing are $2.7 trillion for businesses around the world. The hidden costs of manual data entry can be enough to make or break your business.

6. It’s boring

Continually spending days or hours doing mindless data entry can lead to employee dissatisfaction and turnover. When workers spend hours keying in the same information, they are bound to lose focus, which increases errors and leads to frustration. Data entry work is repetitive and tedious. 55% of employees in a survey cited the collection, uploading, and synching of data as the least productive part of manual data entry. When employees don’t feel productive, their morale lowers and they are then more prone to make mistakes.

Automation is the solution

How can companies save themselves the time and money that is lost through manual data entry processes? Automating as much as possible is one way to recoup these costs. By using machine learning and automation, the software can automate much of the data entry process, leading to fewer mistakes and speeding up the process.

Premier Software uses AI, machine learning, and automation to speed up invoice entry and other repetitive tasks, so you can spend time working on your business and less time entering data. For a demo of how our automation works to save you time and money, schedule one today.Author Biography:

Dawn Killough is a construction writer with over 20 years of experience with construction payments, from the perspectives of subcontractors and general contractors. Dawn has held roles such as a staff accountant, green building advisor, project assistant, and contract administrator.  Her work for general contractors, design firms, and subcontractors has even led to the publication of blogs on several construction tech websites and her book, Green Building Design 101.