Dawn Killough

Dawn Killough

Dawn Killough is a construction writer with over 20 years of experience with construction payments, from the perspectives of subcontractors and general contractors. Dawn has held roles such as a staff accountant, green building advisor, project assistant, and contract administrator. Her work for general contractors, design firms, and subcontractors has even led to the publication of blogs on several construction tech websites and her book, Green Building Design 101.

Technology That Is Changing The World Of Construction

Over the centuries, humans have developed new ways to build taller, stronger and more beautiful creations with game-changing materials – but what does the future hold for construction technology? In today’s world of rapidly advancing technology, many amazing new innovations come to mind that we believe will have a great impact on the future of construction.

We have compiled a short list of three of the most exciting innovations. Some are even in use today.

  1. Drones
    – Drones, often considered to be no more than a toy for children of all ages, represent one of biggest potential disruptors of the construction industry. Equipped with a camera drones can be used for everything from providing onsite tours for investors to exploring hazardous situations before sending members of your crew in. Drones will not only reduce or eliminate the need to risk the wellbeing of your employees in unstable conditions such as potential gas leaks or potential collapse or cave in but they will also act as an extension to every worker, allowing access to smaller and higher spaces and providing simple and fast Solutions to age old problems. (Drone bridge clip).
  2.  Virtual Reality – With the recent release of the Oculus Rift, and the inevitability of virtual reality becoming mainstream, it will not be    long before these head sets are a common sight in the construction industry. Designers can create a 1 to 1 model of buildings that will allow both clients and contractors to view and interact with seemingly life size mock ups. This will allow for vital changes and redesigns to be made before construction begins, saving not only money but time as well. In addition to this, trade schools will likely adopt VR for training and simulation processes allowing young tradesmen to apply knowledge in a challenging but completely safe testing environment.
  3. Augmented Reality – The younger and more jobsite applicable brother to VR, Augmented Reality is already deployed in the field. These headsets (Like Google glass) overlay data, live video links, and environmental readings overtop of the surrounding environment. This becomes incredibly useful for when technicians are repairing or installing complicated equipment, or when working in extreme or dangerous environments. One really great example of this tech is the DAQRI Headset, which takes the form of a futuristic hard hat, a technological gem that was recently adopted by Elon Musk on his Hyperloop.

 

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